Paul Ronnander (PhD Candidate)

 

About Me

Paul Ronnander, PhD candidate, is currently a part-time student in department of Chemical, Biological & Pharmaceutical engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology. His research interests include: mathematical modelling of chemical and biological processes such as drug delivery, transdermal delivery systems, microneedles, and drug delivery aided by iontophoresis. In addition, he works full time in the pharmaceutical industry managing scale-up and commercialization of oral thin films and transdermal delivery systems. 

 

Research

 

Modelling and Analysis of Microneedle-Based Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems

The transdermal drug delivery method is an attractive minimally invasive delivery method that can be self-administered and delivers controlled rate of drug through the skin. However, this drug delivery method is limited to small, lipophilic molecules due to skins epidermal barrier.

Microneedles are a potential alternative capable of effectively bypassing the epidermal barrier to achieve systemic uptake of larger, hydrophilic molecules in the dermal layers. This research will focus on development of a theoretical model based on transport phenomena principles to assess and predict drug delivery of encapsulated drug molecules in soluble microneedle systems and soluble microneedles aided by iontophoresis. This theoretical model will then be used to identify critical attributes of the microneedle system (ex. microneedle height, base width, pitch, density), critical formulation factors (ex. Concentration, Solubility and strength) and critical process parameters (ex. current density). These factors will be validated using in-vivo permeation experiments.

The validated model can be used to explain future experimental results, aide in product design and development of manufacturing processes. This model will potentially reduce R&D expenses and increase quality of results. Also, the model will make the clinical research less empirical and more reliable then trial-and-error experimental procedures.